i liek writng

suck mah dix

5 notes

fuck all ya fuckers if you think writting good or shit makes any difference goddamn it just get a fuckin blog now and be 24 and not have any exreience with anything shit and they’ll fuckin suck your dick to publish your fuckin book of piss and shit 50,000 words of piss and shit just fuck you all fuckers ima go home and jerk off into my hand after i sat on it to make it numb so it feels like somebody elses hand and hey conventinetly that’s a fuckin metaphor for the existence of a fucking writer. those were air quotes. air quotes around the word writer. remember that when u write it down. i’m so drunk right now class dismissed
inspirational writing teacher

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TSM fanfic short short

"Fuck" Chaox screamed angrily.  Xpecial had just missed an exhaust in a duo queue game.  He took off his headphones and threw is mouse across the room.

"I fucked up man, sorry."  Xpecial took off his headphones too and began to massage Chaox’s tired shoulders.  He whispered in his ear.  "You can punish me later."

Later they had some really crazy hardcore S&M gay sex and it was super hot.

Filed under tsm

2 notes

ohheyitslivia asked: Um can you please stop trolling my message box and negatively publicizing Yeah Write? I don't know what the fuck "list I took you off of" you're even talking about, and I don't appreciate your baseless antagonism.

I don’t appreciate being taken off lists >:(

199 notes

thismightwork:

But, Is It Too Pretty?
Nick Miller has to be getting tired of hearing about Ernest Hemingway.  That is, if a debut novelist can ever grow weary of having his name mentioned in the same breath as one of the luminaries of American letters.
To be sure, the author has invited a great deal of the comparisons with his book, Isn’t It Pretty To Think So.  The title, for starters, is a line from Hemingway’s first novel, The Sun Also Rises.  Miller named his protagonist Jake, which is what Hemingway’s leading man/narrator goes by as well.  Miller’s Jake, being an aspiring writer, also makes a handful of references to Hemingway, including a conversation directly discussing the ending and greater meaning of his predecessor’s debut.
Those little tie-ins make easy fodder for comparison, but Isn’t It Pretty To Think So is a better book than that, and deserves a closer comparison.  It has been said that Hemingway came as near as anyone to describing the hopes, angst, and lifestyle of his generation in their youthful early adulthood following World War I, at least as far as the expat set in Paris was concerned.  The same argument can be made for Miller’s attempt at capturing a particular generation (the Millennials) at a particular moment in history (following the economic meltdown of the late aughts). 
I don’t want to give away details for those who will read the book, but I will say that no book I have read in the past has so thoroughly and vividly portrayed the unique lifestyle and existential quandary of the Millennial Generation.  Lacking the immediate existential crisis that Hemingway’s World War I generation had faced, the characters in Isn’t It Pretty To Think So are left to confront the more meta question of what existence, identity, and meaning really are in a life that is essentially lived in two realms, the analog and the digital.  Where Jake Barnes in The Sun Also Rises had to question whether life was worthwhile after being injured in war, Miller’s Jake wonders if it’s worthwhile if it doesn’t end up on Facebook.
The duality of personality brought to light by Isn’t It Pretty To Think So is a new phenomena, and it is shaping the way we live and view life.  In this regard, Miller goes further then his contemporaries have yet ventured (I’m thinking of Nick McDonnell and Tao Lin, among others), and it is the reason this book, much like Hemingway’s, should have staying power in the future.
That said, I cannot finish this little review without adding one critique, one little small detail that grated on me a bit from page one.  I offer this bit of constructive criticism with the caveat that Hemingway is one of my three favorite writers, and for a very specific reason, which stands at a polar opposite from Miller’s novel.  It is this: Hemingway is noted for, and revered by me because of, what is often referred to as a spare, simple style of writing.  As he said, “My aim is to put down what I see in the best and simplest way.”  There is not, in The Sun Also Rises, a single superfluous word, and yet the story does not suffer.  Hemingway trusted the reader’s imagination and ability to see and feel and experience what he was trying to convey.  He didn’t need flowery language to do so.
That is my only criticism of Isn’t It Pretty To Think So; the language, in parts, is overly descriptive and seems to try too hard to be beautiful and writerly.  It’s a small complaint, and certainly one that damn near every writer is wont to do from time to time, but it just happens to be a sticking point for me in any book.
The occasional overly ornamental description aside, what Nick Miller has done with Isn’t It Pretty To Think So is quite remarkable for a first novel: it invites comparison to a literary giant and more than holds its own against them.  It has me hoping that this is the dawning of a similarly illustrious, and prolific, career from its creator.

i read this book to my brother and he went in a coma from the badness I think we read a different book are you sure you aren’t reading something else buddy?

thismightwork:

But, Is It Too Pretty?


Nick Miller has to be getting tired of hearing about Ernest Hemingway.  That is, if a debut novelist can ever grow weary of having his name mentioned in the same breath as one of the luminaries of American letters.

To be sure, the author has invited a great deal of the comparisons with his book, Isn’t It Pretty To Think So.  The title, for starters, is a line from Hemingway’s first novel, The Sun Also Rises.  Miller named his protagonist Jake, which is what Hemingway’s leading man/narrator goes by as well.  Miller’s Jake, being an aspiring writer, also makes a handful of references to Hemingway, including a conversation directly discussing the ending and greater meaning of his predecessor’s debut.

Those little tie-ins make easy fodder for comparison, but Isn’t It Pretty To Think So is a better book than that, and deserves a closer comparison.  It has been said that Hemingway came as near as anyone to describing the hopes, angst, and lifestyle of his generation in their youthful early adulthood following World War I, at least as far as the expat set in Paris was concerned.  The same argument can be made for Miller’s attempt at capturing a particular generation (the Millennials) at a particular moment in history (following the economic meltdown of the late aughts). 

I don’t want to give away details for those who will read the book, but I will say that no book I have read in the past has so thoroughly and vividly portrayed the unique lifestyle and existential quandary of the Millennial Generation.  Lacking the immediate existential crisis that Hemingway’s World War I generation had faced, the characters in Isn’t It Pretty To Think So are left to confront the more meta question of what existence, identity, and meaning really are in a life that is essentially lived in two realms, the analog and the digital.  Where Jake Barnes in The Sun Also Rises had to question whether life was worthwhile after being injured in war, Miller’s Jake wonders if it’s worthwhile if it doesn’t end up on Facebook.

The duality of personality brought to light by Isn’t It Pretty To Think So is a new phenomena, and it is shaping the way we live and view life.  In this regard, Miller goes further then his contemporaries have yet ventured (I’m thinking of Nick McDonnell and Tao Lin, among others), and it is the reason this book, much like Hemingway’s, should have staying power in the future.

That said, I cannot finish this little review without adding one critique, one little small detail that grated on me a bit from page one.  I offer this bit of constructive criticism with the caveat that Hemingway is one of my three favorite writers, and for a very specific reason, which stands at a polar opposite from Miller’s novel.  It is this: Hemingway is noted for, and revered by me because of, what is often referred to as a spare, simple style of writing.  As he said, “My aim is to put down what I see in the best and simplest way.”  There is not, in The Sun Also Rises, a single superfluous word, and yet the story does not suffer.  Hemingway trusted the reader’s imagination and ability to see and feel and experience what he was trying to convey.  He didn’t need flowery language to do so.

That is my only criticism of Isn’t It Pretty To Think So; the language, in parts, is overly descriptive and seems to try too hard to be beautiful and writerly.  It’s a small complaint, and certainly one that damn near every writer is wont to do from time to time, but it just happens to be a sticking point for me in any book.

The occasional overly ornamental description aside, what Nick Miller has done with Isn’t It Pretty To Think So is quite remarkable for a first novel: it invites comparison to a literary giant and more than holds its own against them.  It has me hoping that this is the dawning of a similarly illustrious, and prolific, career from its creator.

i read this book to my brother and he went in a coma from the badness I think we read a different book are you sure you aren’t reading something else buddy?

(via nickmiller)

50 notes

YEAH WRITE!: The Yellow Bird Magazine

yeahwriters:

Hello, my name is Hannah and I am currently in the process of starting my own literary magazine called The Yellow Bird Magazine. Our website it yellowbirdmagazine.wordpress.com and we would love to receive submissions of any kinds. All the information is on the website and even if you are not…

guyz ple ignore this webzone they took me off a list one time fuck em